Part A: Clinique iD Range – In-depth Reviews and Ingredient Analyses of the Moisturising Bases

It’s not very often that exciting skincare products get released. When it comes to the excitement factor it’s usually makeup all the way right?

However, Clinique recently released a new skincare range called Clinique iD, where you can create your custom-blend hydration system. The products look interesting and the concept of customising skincare products will appeal to many.

The customisation part is very easy. Firstly, you have to choose your base out of 3 possible moisturisers, the moisturising lotion, moisturising gel and hydrating gel. Then you have to choose a cartridge out of 5 possible options, which thankfully are also colour coded. The white cartridge is for uneven skin tone, the green for irritation, the orange one for fatigue, the blue for uneven texture and pores and finally, the purple one for lines and wrinkles. What all this means is that there are 3 base moisturisers and 5 possible addon cartridges creating a total of 15 combinations. Not really what I would call personal customisation, because the options have nothing to do with you specifically, it’s more like a range with a good amount of options.

Clinique iD 8_20190210214908758

Nevertheless, I am dedicating 3 posts on this range in order to go through and analyse all products and options. This post is all about step 1, choosing which base moisturiser is best for you out of the 3 options. In the second post I will be analysing the cartridges and in the third post I will be talking about which combinations are best and which ones you should or shouldn’t try out.

Clinique iD moisturiser bases_20190210201107479

In this post I will be analysing the Dramatically Different Moisturising Lotion, the Dramatically Different Oil-Control Gel and the Dramatically Different Hydrating Jelly. Which base moisturiser is best? Let’s find out!

 

Packaging

All 3 Clinique ID moisturisers come in the same outer and actual product packaging. However, note that these moisturisers are not new, meaning that they have not been developed specifically for this range, they are just re-purposed. This means that you can find them in other type of Clinique packaging as well. I am only describing the Clinique iD range packaging in this post.

The outer packaging for these moisturisers has the typical Clinique branding and design and they all look the same with the only difference being the name and colour of the moisturiser. I really like that at the very front of the packaging there is a picture of the moisturiser bottle that has a small empty space at the top (not full of moisturiser) as this reflects how much product you actually get in each bottle. They are on purpose not full otherwise you wouldn’t be able to insert a cartridge, in the next step, without spilling out some moisturiser. It’s great that the picture doesn’t lead you on and reflects the truth.

Clinique iD moisturising bases 4_20190210201759099

The packaging also reflects the fact that these moisturisers are the “bases” by having the number 1 on them and showing on the side of the packaging that for number 2 you have a choice between a few cartridges.

The actual moisturiser products come in a plastic, square bottle that contains 115mL of product. They all look the same with the only difference being again the name and colour of the moisturiser.

The bottles come with a white plastic screw cap. This means that they are not practical to use on their own because if you try to get moisturiser out by tipping the bottle you will end up pouring out A LOT more product than you need. They are meant to be used with a pump which comes from the cartridges in part 2. If you want to only use these moisturisers on their own then I recommend you buy them in their different packaging that is not part of the Clinique iD product range. As I said above, these moisturisers are not specific to this range, they have been Clinique products for a while, and you can buy them on their own in bottles that come with a pump already.

Overall I thought that the bottles look nice (and even nicer when you put the cartridge in) and don’t feel cheap, even though they are made of plastic.

Winner: All three moisturisers come in the same outer and inner packaging and there is no advantage here for any of them.

 

Price

Even though the Clinique iD product range has several different products, the combination of a moisturiser+cartridge, whichever ones you might choose, comes in one price. For a 115mL bottle of moisturiser + 10mL cartridge you will have to pay £36.

If you buy the moisturisers on their own, outside the Clinique iD range, you will pay £31 for a 125mL bottle.

The price difference is not that big, but then again the added value from a cartridge that is only 10mL is not much either. It all depends on the ingredients and if they are worth it. Check out the part B post that analyses the cartridges’ ingredients to find out more.

Winner: Equal. All three moisturisers are the same price.

 

Texture and Colour

The one major category where these three moisturisers differ on is texture.

The Moisturising Lotion has a pale yellow, thin cream texture. The Oil-Control Gel is also pale yellow and has a thin cream texture but it feels a little more watery or thinner on the skin. It is worth to note that the yellow colour in both Moisturising Lotion and Oil-Control Gel comes from added dyes in the product. Added colour in cosmetics usually serves a psychological purpose giving the consumer a feeling that the product will be moisturising, or good at it’s said function. However, practically dyes are unnecessary ingredients to put on your skin and can for some they can even increase the chance of irritation.

Finally, the Hydrating Jelly is transparent colourless and has a very thin, almost water-like texture. It might look like a gel in the bottle (and scientifically it probably is a hydro-gel) but it is very thin in texture, so much so that if you were to put it into a squeezy tube it could run out on it’s own without squeezing. It’s tricky to tell which skin type will benefit more from this texture because although the best texture for oily skin is a creamy-gel, its super watery texture might appeal best to dry skin. Although it feels nice on the skin, the texture can lead to a mess when you dispense this gel and it is the one moisturiser out of the three that will run down your hand the most.

Winner: It’s hard to say which texture is best because it really depends on your skin type. However, the very runny texture of the Hydrating Jelly that turns out to not be a jelly at all, is the biggest disadvantage here. The Moisturising Lotion and Oil-Control Gel are more practical products texture wise.

 

Smell

The Moisturising Lotion has the worst smell out of the 3. It has a faint, but easy to smell scent by just placing the product on your face. Sadly, I can only describe it as tyres or rubber, something elastic type of scent. It’s not super strong but it’s not pleasant and it’s not what I would want a moisturiser to smell like. It also seems to get worse over time or if it’s exposed to heat, so this might be due to decomposition of ingredients.

The Oil-Control Gel has a subtle moisturiser cream scent. It’s super light and you might not smell it at all unless you put your nose into the product.

Finally, the Hydrating Jelly has a faint scent that is stronger than the Oil-Control Gel but not as strong as the Moisturising Lotion. It smells like jelly with cream type of scent that is a little on the unpleasant side but nothing major.

All three moisturisers are fragrance free and their smell comes naturally from the ingredients contained.

Winner: The Hydrating Lotion is by far the worst smelling and the Oil-Control Gel the best.

 

SPF protection

Neither moisturiser contains SPF protection.

To find out why you need SPF at all times and how much check out: Everything you need to know about sunscreens and SPF

 

Skin type compatibility

The Moisturising Lotion is stated by Clinique to be best for very dry to dry combination skin. However, I have used this moisturiser on my oily skin and didn’t feel that it was “too moisturising” or incompatible with oily skin. At the same time, I’ve also used this on my partner who has very dry skin and I didn’t think that it made too much of a difference on him either. What I’m saying is that you might be able to use this moisturiser no matter what skin type you are with the exception of, if you are oily perhaps don’t use this during the day under your makeup because it won’t help you with oil control.

The Oil-Control Gel is stated by Clinique to be best for combination oily to oily skin. I wore this cream under my makeup without any other mattifying or oil control product (except the Estèe Lauder Double Wear foundation) and it did manage to keep me oil free most of the day. The half-gel half-cream feeling texture is perfect for oily skin but at the same time it feels hydrating enough on the skin to probably be ok for other skin types too but perhaps not for dry skin.

Lastly, the Hydrating Jelly is said to be for all skin types and I would say that is true. It feels moisturising but not overly thick or creamy so it will satisfy both ends of the spectrum, the dry skin and the oily type. At the same time though since it doesn’t have any mattifying control, I wouldn’t recommend this under makeup if you are oily.

Winner: Equal. This really depends on your skin type but from trying them out I thought that all can be used by many different skin types at different times of the day. My oily skin and my partners dry skin tolerated all of them, it just depends on the application, like for example if you are looking for oil control under makeup etc.

 

Other

All three moisturisers last for 24M.

Here’s what Clinique says about the Moisturising Lotion:

Skin Types: 1, 2

What It Is
The UK’s #1 Moisturiser gives skin the “drink” it needs to maintain optimal moisture balance, and is step 3 in our customized 3-Step Skin Care System.
This dermatologist-developed face moisturiser softens, smooths and improves skin leaving it glowing. No parabens. No phthalates. No fragrance. 

What It Does

  • Genius yellow moisturiser hydrates all day.
  • Slips on easily, absorbs quickly.
  • Helps strengthen skin’s own moisture barrier, so more moisture stays in.
  • Skin that holds onto moisture has a youthful-looking glow.

 

Here’s what Clinique says about the Oil-Control Gel:

Skin Types: 3, 4

What It Is
The UK’s #1 Moisturiser that gives skin the “drink” it needs to maintain optimal moisture balance and is step 3 in our customized 3-Step Skin Care System.
This dermatologist-developed oil-free face moisturiser softens, smooths and improves skin leaving it glowing. No parabens. No phthalates. No fragrance. 

What It Does

  • Combines oil-free hydration with skin-strengthening ingredients.
  • Slips on easily, absorbs quickly.
  • Balances and refreshes oilier skin types.

 

Here’s what Clinique says about the Hydrating Jelly:

Skin Types: Works for all skin types.

What It Is
Step 3 in our customized 3-Step Skin Care System.
An unbelievably lightweight, water-jelly that delivers 24-hour hydration repair plus pollution protection. What It Does

  • 24-hour hydrator with Clean Shield Technology™ locks in the good—like moisture—and filters out the bad.
  • Strengthens skin’s moisture barrier and improves resiliency.
  • Unique water-jelly texture feels fresh, penetrates quickly.
  • Oil-free formula is non-sticky, leaves no residue.
  • Skin is smooth, strong and healthy with a pure, clean glow.

Winner: Equal. There isn’t a real difference between the three moisturisers in this category.

 

Clinique iD moisturiser bases 3_20190210200737340

 

Practicality of use – user experience

All three moisturisers were easy to use after the cartridge was applied in step 2, that introduces a pump. However, as I mentioned above, the Hydrating Jelly texture, which is basically not a jelly at all and more like a watery-texture, is the least practical and most annoying to use as it can run down your hand, and if you don’t have a pump to dispense it, it can get very messy pouring or squeezing it out.

The Moisturising Lotion was also practically a little annoying, not in terms of using it, but because of its smell. I must admit there were times when I was sat on my sofa thinking I don’t want this tyre-rubber-smelling thing on my face.

Winner: The Hydrating Jelly is the least practical to use due to its texture and the Oil-Control Gel the best.

 

Results

As disappointing as this might sound, I haven’t noticed any skincare changes after using these three moisturisers. However, I wasn’t expecting any because the rest of my skincare is good and includes most of the ingredients my skin needs to be healthy.

Additionally, these moisturises don’t include any high skincare value ingredients that can make a huge difference to your skin like for example, vitamin A, ceramides etc. Don’t expect major changes and don’t build your entire skincare around these moisturisers. For more info why check out the Ingredients section.

It is worth to note though that all three moisturisers leave the skin feeling moisturised, soft and smooth. All three moisturisers are absorbed quickly and do not leave any residues behind.

Additionally, the Oil-Control Gel did give me results in terms of controlling my oil production. I was able to wear it under makeup for 8 hours without becoming oily or shiny. So at the very least, it will control your oil production but bear in mind that there are other products with better ingredients and SPF that will do that too. Here’s the one I recommend the most: A nourishing, mattifying day cream with SPF – Paula’s Choice RESIST Super-Light Daily Wrinkle Defence Broad Spectrum SPF30 – In-Depth Review and Ingredient Analysis

Winner: Neither gave visible skincare results but the Oil-Control Gel at least does control oil production.

 

Ingredients

All three moisturisers are fragrance free which is a great advantage.

The Moisturising Lotion contains only 22 ingredients of which 15 will offer you some kind of skincare benefit (some more than others), 2 potential negatives and 9 irritants. Most of the interesting ingredients are listed after Triethanolamine which is a pH adjuster and is usually found in concentrations less than 5%. This means that the rest of the ingredients after it are present in very small amounts too. This might not necessarily be a negative, as you don’t always need large amounts of ingredients to make a difference in the skin (for example just 1% retinol can completely change your skin), but this coupled with the overall weakness of the ingredients contained leaves a disappointing feeling. This product doesn’t contain many ingredient skincare must haves (like ceramides etc) and even lacks ingredients that have become mainstream, like vitamin C and E. Even lipsticks contain those these days.

As a result, the Moisturising Lotion is not the most nourishing moisturiser your money can buy, the ingredients are fairly basic and some even outdated. For this reason alone I would recommend a skip on this one and it is disappointing that a relatively weak product still remains as one of Clinique’s showcase products.

The Oil-Control Gel contains 33 ingredients of which 22 will offer you some skincare benefit, 1 potential negative and 11 irritants. This moisturiser is better ingredient-wise than the Moisturising Lotion and while it still doesn’t contain high value skincare ingredients, there are at least some basics like vitamin E and caffeine. Unfortunately though, while it might control your oils if you are oily, other skin types might find it drying. Additionally, even if you are oily, the only time when an oil-control cream is highly beneficial is during the daytime but sadly this cream does not contain SPF. While the Oil-Control Gel is a superior product to the Moisturising Lotion it is still not the best skincare your money can buy. For a great nourishing, mattifying and SPF containing day cream check out: A nourishing, mattifying day cream with SPF – Paula’s Choice RESIST Super-Light Daily Wrinkle Defence Broad Spectrum SPF30 – In-Depth Review and Ingredient Analysis

Finally, the Hydrating Jelly contains 30 ingredients of which 24 will offer you some skincare benefit, 1 potential negative and 6 irritants. This Jelly doesn’t contain dyes which is an advantage over the other two moisturisers. While the ingredients contained are better than the Moisturising Lotion, it is on par or a little worse than the Oil-Control Gel (it’s hard to tell without knowing exact amounts of ingredients). On the plus side, the Jelly is suitable for all skin types, as opposed to the Oil-Control Gel, but it also lacks skincare basics like vitamin E. Its annoying, not jelly at all, texture is also a major drawback. Still not the best skincare your money can buy but it is better than the Moisturising Lotion for sure.

Overall, the three base moisturisers are relatively weak compared to some other skincare products in the market and sadly, the most popular Clinique moisturiser is actually also the weakest. If you must buy one of the three, choose between the Oil-Control Gel and Hydrating Jelly and give the Moisturising Lotion a pass.

To keep this article short, I am only listing the skin nourishing or skin positive/negative ingredients and ignoring the ones that only play formulation purposes. For the full list of these product’s ingredients scroll down to the “full list of ingredients” section.

 

Ingredient positives:

Ingredient positives of the Moisturising Lotion:

    1. Water\Aqua\Eau based formulation.
    2. Mineral Oil\Paraffinum Liquidum\Huile Minérale – Skin conditioner and replenisher. For all the details check out: Mineral oil in cosmetics – is it worth seeking out? and Is mineral oil in cosmetics safe?
    3. Glycerin – Found naturally in the skin so can be seen as a skin replenishing ingredient. A skin conditioner that helps improve and smooth the appearance of skin. A good moisturiser that is almost always present in moisturising products.
    4. Petrolatum – A moisturiser, skin conditioner, skin protector and soother. Despite the large negative publicity, there isn’t as much scientific evidence to support that this ingredient is negative for the skin.
    5. Glyceryl Stearate – A lubricant giving smooth and soft skin appearance.
      Easily penetrates skin, slows water from escaping by forming barrier, anti-oxidant.
    6. Sesamum Indicum (Sesame) Oil – Skin smoothing and soothing, moisturiser.
    7. Urea – A humectant and skin conditioner that is used very often in products for dry skin.
    8. Lanolin Alcohol – A fatty alcohol that can act as a skin conditioner and replenisher, good for dry skin.
    9. Hordeum Vulgare (Barley) Extract\Extrait D’Orge – Anti-oxidant.
    10. Cucumis Sativus (Cucumber) Fruit Extract – A skin conditioner that contains small amounts of vitamin C, caffeic acid (an antioxidant), fatty acids, the mineral silica, and other trace minerals giving it anti-oxidant properties.
    11. Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seedcake – Skin conditioner and absorbent.
    12. Propylene Glycol Dicaprate – Skin conditioner.
    13. Sodium Hyaluronate – A hero compound, known as the “fountain of youth” molecule. Plays a major role in anti-ageing processes and is found in embryos in high concentrations. Can hold onto water 1000 times of its weight meaning that it is an amazing moisturiser by locking moisture in. Helps wounds and burns heal and it’s linked to increased collagen generation Also used as a temporary cosmetic filler.
    14. Butylene Glycol – A humectant that can preserve water and a skin conditioner.
    15. Pentylene Glycol – A humectant (=locks water in).

 

Ingredient positives for the Oil-Control Gel:

  1. Water\Aqua\Eau based formulation.
  2. Dimethicone – Creates a barrier and can therefore protect the skin. Also acts as a skin conditioner. It leaves a silky feeling and can even fill in lines temporarily.
  3. Isododecane – Solvent and humectant (=locks moisture in).
  4. Butylene Glycol – A humectant that can preserve water and a skin conditioner.
  5. Bis-Peg-18 Methyl Ether Dimethyl Silane – A skin conditioner and humectant amongst other functions.
  6. Glycerin – Found naturally in the skin so can be seen as a skin replenishing ingredient. A skin conditioner that helps improve and smooth the appearance of skin. A good moisturiser that is almost always present in moisturising products.
  7. Laminaria Saccharina Extract – Skin protecting, soothing and fragrance.
  8. Polygonum Cuspidatum Root Extract – Anti-oxidant.
  9. Saccharomyces Lysate Extract – A yeast that can act as a skin conditioner and humectant (=locks water in). Can be a source of anti-oxidants.
  10. Cucumis Sativus (Cucumber) Fruit Extract – A skin conditioner that contains small amounts of vitamin C, caffeic acid (an antioxidant), fatty acids, the mineral silica, and other trace minerals giving it anti-oxidant properties.
  11. Hordeum Vulgare (Barley) Extract\Extrait D’Orge – Anti-oxidant.
  12. Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seedcake – Skin conditioner and absorbent.
  13. Caffeine– Potent anti-oxidant, improves puffy eyes, sooths and penetrates the skin providing a constricting effect which reduces redness. Slows down the process of photo-ageing.
  14. Trehalose – Moisturiser.
  15. Sodium Hyaluronate – A hero compound, known as the “fountain of youth” molecule. Plays a major role in anti-ageing processes and is found in embryos in high concentrations. Can hold onto water 1000 times of its weight meaning that it is an amazing moisturiser by locking moisture in. Helps wounds and burns heal and it’s linked to increased collagen generation Also used as a temporary cosmetic filler.
  16. Tocopheryl Acetate – A hero compound, more stable form of vitamin E. A good anti-oxidant and conditioning agent that can also moisturise and help with inflammation.
  17. Polysilicone-11 – A film former which in turn has water binding abilities and leaves a smooth feeling on the skin.
  18. Silica – An absorbent and anti-caking agent, good for oily skin. Can improve spreadability and help the product adhere to the skin. It can even prevent setting of the product ensuring that it is evenly pigmented.
  19. Propylene Glycol Dicaprate – Skin conditioner.
  20. Lactobacillus Ferment– Skin conditioner.
  21. Caprylyl Glycol– Skin conditioner and anti-microbial agent.
  22. Hexylene Glycol – Skin conditioner.

 

Ingredient positives for the Hydrating Jelly:

  1. Water\Aqua\Eau based formulation.
  2. Bis-Peg-18 Methyl Ether Dimethyl Silane – A skin conditioner and humectant amongst other functions.
  3. Butylene Glycol – A humectant that can preserve water and a skin conditioner.
  4. Glycerin – Found naturally in the skin so can be seen as a skin replenishing ingredient. A skin conditioner that helps improve and smooth the appearance of skin. A good moisturiser that is almost always present in moisturising products.
  5. Cucumis Sativus (Cucumber) Fruit Extract – A skin conditioner that contains small amounts of vitamin C, caffeic acid (an antioxidant), fatty acids, the mineral silica, and other trace minerals giving it anti-oxidant properties.
  6. Hypnea Musciformis (Algae) Extract – Anti-oxidant.
  7. Gelidiella Acerosa Extract – Anti-oxidant.
  8. Hordeum Vulgare (Barley) Extract\Extrait D’Orge – Anti-oxidant.
  9. Padina Pavonica Thallus Extract – Skin conditioner and anti-oxidant.
  10. Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seedcake – Skin conditioner and absorbent.
  11. Sucrose – Skin conditioner, replenisher and humectant.
  12. Caffeine – Potent anti-oxidant, improves puffy eyes, sooths and penetrates the skin providing a constricting effect which reduces redness. Slows down the process of photo-ageing.
  13. Sodium Hyaluronate – A hero compound, known as the “fountain of youth” molecule. Plays a major role in anti-ageing processes and is found in embryos in high concentrations. Can hold onto water 1000 times of its weight meaning that it is an amazing moisturiser by locking moisture in. Helps wounds and burns heal and it’s linked to increased collagen generation Also used as a temporary cosmetic filler.
  14. Hydroxyethyl Urea – Skin conditioner and humectant.
  15. Hydrolyzed Rice Extract – A skin conditioner.
  16. Sorbitol – Skin conditioner.
  17. Sodium Polyaspartate – Skin conditioner and humectant.
  18. Ethylhexylglycerin – A weak preservative and skin conditioner that is often used in ointments for eczema
  19. Propylene Glycol Dicaprate – Skin conditioner.
  20. Caprylyl Glycol – A skin conditioner and anti-microbial agent. Also a good moisturiser.
  21. Trehalose – Moisturiser.
  22. Hexylene Glycol – Skin conditioner.
  23. Citric Acid – A natural preservative, can be used to even out skin tone.
  24. Sodium Citrate – An anti-oxidant and preservative.

 

Ingredient negatives:

Ingredient negatives of the Moisturising Lotion:

  1. Urea – There are quite a few concerns around urea including cancer and Dementia disease. However, more studies are needed to confirm these claims.
  2. Yellow 6 (Ci 15985), Yellow 5 (Ci 19140), Red 33 (Ci 17200) – Added dyes that give the cream it’s yellow colour. Dyes do not offer any skincare benefit but can cause sensitisation or irritation in some. Some dyes can bioaccumulate and others are suspected carcinogens. While there is not much evidence for either, they are an unnesecary risk in cosmetics. Dyes are added for the psychological benefit of creating a product that looks the part and you will believe in. Different colours being associated with different functions is something that has been extensively studied and there are examples even from placebo drug trials.

 

Ingredient negatives for the Oil-Control Gel:

  1. Yellow 5 (Ci 19140), Red 4 (Ci 14700), Yellow 6 (Ci 15985) – Added dyes that give the cream it’s yellow colour. Dyes do not offer any skincare benefit but can cause sensitisation or irritation in some. Some dyes can bioaccumulate and others are suspected carcinogens. While there is not much evidence for either, they are an unnesecary risk in cosmetics. Dyes are added for the psychological benefit of creating a product that looks the part and you will believe in. Different colours being associated with different functions is something that has been extensively studied and there are examples even from placebo drug trials.

 

Ingredient negatives for the Hydrating Jelly:

  1. Polysorbate 80– Although there is no solid scientific proof, this ingredient has been the subject of a couple of studies noticing cancer, developmental and reproductive toxicity concerns

 

Ingredients that can cause irritation to some:

This is actually really case specific, as different people have different sensitivities and allergies. Just because a compound has been reported by some to cause sensitivity, it doesn’t mean you will have an issue. “Sensitizer” compounds being present is not a negative in my opinion, as this is the case with pretty much everything out there and funnily enough I’ve seen products that are targeted specifically for sensitive skin, containing some compounds that have been reported by some, or are known to be, sensitizers.

If you have sensitive skin or you are prone to skin sensitisation and unwanted reactions, try a little bit of this at the back of your hand first and consult a medical doctor if you are concerned. Never use cosmetics on irritated or broken skin.

Check out: What is sensitive skin? What are the causes and what can we do?

The following compounds present in the Moisturising Lotion have been either proven or claimed by some to be sensitizers, irritants, allergens etc: Urea, Lanolin Alcohol, Triethanolamine, Butylene Glycol, Pentylene Glycol, Phenoxyethanol, Yellow 6 (Ci 15985), Yellow 5 (Ci 19140), Red 33 (Ci 17200).

The following compounds present in the Oil-Control Gel have been either proven or claimed by some to be sensitizers, irritants, allergens etc: Butylene Glycol, Caffeine, Tocopheryl Acetate, Oleth-10, Laureth-23, Laureth-4, Hexylene Glycol, Phenoxyethanol, Yellow 5 (Ci 19140), Red 4 (Ci 14700), Yellow 6 (Ci 15985).

The following compounds present in the Hydrating Jelly have been either proven or claimed by some to be sensitizers, irritants, allergens etc: Butylene Glycol, Caffeine, Sodium Hydroxide, Hexylene Glycol, Citric Acid, Phenoxyethanol.

 

Full list of ingredients:

Clinique Dramatically Different Moisturising Lotion: Water\Aqua\Eau, Mineral Oil\Paraffinum Liquidum\Huile Minérale, Glycerin, Petrolatum, Stearic Acid, Glyceryl Stearate, Sesamum Indicum (Sesame) Oil, Urea, Lanolin Alcohol, Triethanolamine, Hordeum Vulgare (Barley) Extract\Extrait D’Orge, Cucumis Sativus (Cucumber) Fruit Extract, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seedcake, Propylene Glycol Dicaprate, Sodium Hyaluronate, Butylene Glycol, Pentylene Glycol, Trisodium Edta, Phenoxyethanol, Yellow 6 (Ci 15985), Yellow 5 (Ci 19140), Red 33 (Ci 17200).

Clinique Dramatically Different Oil-Control Gel: Water\Aqua\Eau, Dimethicone, Isododecane, Butylene Glycol, Bis-Peg-18 Methyl Ether Dimethyl Silane, Glycerin, Laminaria Saccharina Extract, Polygonum Cuspidatum Root Extract, Saccharomyces Lysate Extract, Cucumis Sativus (Cucumber) Fruit Extract, Hordeum Vulgare (Barley) Extract\Extrait D’Orge, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seedcake, Caffeine, Trehalose, Sodium Hyaluronate, Tocopheryl Acetate, Polysilicone-11, Silica, Propylene Glycol Dicaprate, Oleth-10, Lactobacillus Ferment, Laureth-23, Laureth-4, Ammonium Acryloyldimethyltaurate/Vp Copolymer, Carbomer, Caprylyl Glycol, Hexylene Glycol, Tromethamine, Disodium Edta, Phenoxyethanol, Yellow 5 (Ci 19140), Red 4 (Ci 14700), Yellow 6 (Ci 15985).

Clinique Dramatically Different Hydrating Jelly: Water\Aqua\Eau, Bis-Peg-18 Methyl Ether Dimethyl Silane, Butylene Glycol, Glycerin, Cucumis Sativus (Cucumber) Fruit Extract, Hypnea Musciformis (Algae) Extract, Gelidiella Acerosa Extract, Hordeum Vulgare (Barley) Extract\Extrait D’Orge, Padina Pavonica Thallus Extract, Helianthus Annuus (Sunflower) Seedcake, Sucrose, Caffeine, Sodium Hyaluronate, Hydroxyethyl Urea, Hydrolyzed Rice Extract, Sorbitol, Sodium Polyaspartate, Ppg-6-Decyltetradeceth-30, Ethylhexylglycerin, Propylene Glycol Dicaprate, Caprylyl Glycol, Trehalose, Polysorbate 80, Carbomer, Sodium Hydroxide, Hexylene Glycol, Citric Acid, Sodium Citrate, Disodium Edta, Phenoxyethanol.

 

Clinique iD moisturiser bases 2_20190210200710331

Verdict

The three base moisturisers of the Clinique iD range cover all skin types except the sensitive one. Sadly, even though some of them, like the Moisturising Lotion, are quite popular Clinique products that have existed before this range, they are all relatively skincare weak. Neither of the three moisturisers contains skincare must haves, like ceramides for example, and some don’t even contain skincare basics like vitamin E.

The Moisturising Lotion, is actually the weakest product and the Oil-Control Gel and Hydrating Jelly are mediocre. There are better skincare moisturisers out there (for you budget too) but if you really must choose one of the three then choose between the Oil-Control Gel and Hydrating Jelly depending on application and your skin type.

Not the worst moisturisers out there but not amazing either. You won’t see major skin differences with these products alone, unless your skincare routine is very weak.

 

I am not affiliated with any company or brand. These are my views and experiences.
Beauty is a very personal thing, we all have different skin, requirements and biological build which can influence things. What worked for me might not work for you and vice versa. Have you ever tried these products? Did they work for you? Let me know your experiences below!

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2 responses to Part A: Clinique iD Range – In-depth Reviews and Ingredient Analyses of the Moisturising Bases

  1. zakeeyak says:

    The irony here is that I’ve never tried Dramatically Different mostly because of the colour – it reminds me of a cream that has turned and with the scent – disgusting

    Liked by 1 person

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  1. […] Nevertheless, I am dedicating 3 posts on this range in order to go through and analyse all products and options. This post is all about step 2, choosing which addon cartridge is best for you out of the 5 options. In the third post I will be discussing which combinations are best and which ones you should or shouldn’t try out. If you missed the first post on the 3 possible base moisturisers check out: Part A: Clinique iD Range – In-depth Reviews and Ingredient Analyses of the Moisturising Bases […]

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